• School History


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    Mrs. Linnie McHenry Roberts
    July 10, 1893 - December 5, 1956


    Mrs. Linnie McHenry Roberts was born in Matagorda County, Caney, Texas. Her parents were the late Hale Foster McHenry and Dinah Wiley McHenry. Her father and mother were pioneer landowners in Bay City, Texas. Mrs. Roberts came from a family of three children. She attended the public schools of Matagorda County, and did her college work at Samuel Houston College, Austin, Texas, and Prairie View A&M University, Prairie View, Texas. Later, she completed her college work at Mary Allen College, Crockett, Texas.

    Most of her thirty-two teaching years were done at the old Booker T. Washington and Hilliard High School.

    She was married to Ikeleys Roberts, noted businessman in Bay City. To this union, three children were born. Two daughters became educators. Her son, Eddie, after graduating from college, chose to help his father in the funeral business.

    Mrs. Roberts, as so many who knew her, was a giant of a personality. She was the epitome of an educator, a wife, and a mother. Her humanitarian deeds were not only exhibited with the students she taught, but her giving spirit reached deep within the community in which she lived.

    In early days, when students had to buy books, if a student could not purchase his books, she was always there to buy the books that the student needed. Many days, when students didn't have lunch, she had prepared enough lunch to share with those students. She also never went without her sewing kit. If a child needed a garment mended, she would mend his garment. She would never let that child go home with a tear or a button missing.

    She always wore a smile, and always had that encouraging word to offer anyone who crossed her path. To those co-educators who started in the teaching profession early, she was their mentor.

    Everyone lovingly called her "Miss Linnie." Mrs. Roberts left a legacy to those students whose lives she touched. She left a legacy to her family, children and grandchildren - and today that legacy stands monumental in this community. Today, if she could speak to our young educators, she would say:

    "I leave you love, I leave you hope. I leave you the challenge of developing confidence in one another. I leave you a thirst for knowledge and education. I leave you respect for the use of power. I leave you faith in God. I leave you a desire to live harmoniously with your fellow man. I leave you finally, a responsibility to our young people. I leave you these things."